ex-genius

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The lives and homes lost are obviously going to be the most permanent reminders of mother nature’s recent all-out assault on the northeast, but beyond that, the most apparent scars right now are those of the area’s infrastructure. 
Even today, workers are still pumping out the Brooklyn-Battery (Hugh L. Carey) tunnel, which was said to have flooded from end to end during the storm. 
Measuring 9,117 feet long and roughly 30 feet diameter on the interior, if we assume the ventilation space above and below the roadway also flooded, workers have been faced with the monumental task of, based on my very rough calculations, removing over 48.2 Million gallons of seawater. 

Feel free to run the numbers yourself!
GallonsPerCubicFoot(Pi*TunnelRadius^2*TunnelLength)
or: 7.48052(Pi*30^2*9117)

No matter how you squash the numbers together, that’s a lot of seawater. Don’t know how far along they are in the above photo from the MTA’s flickr - but it looks better than it did. 
As our lives inch back toward normal, slowly and often painfully, we really can’t forget that the reason things are improving is because people are working together and  improving them for us. 
So again - an infinite amount of credit and gratitude needs to be extended not only to the first responders saving lives, but also to the men and women working under our rivers and streets, in tunnels the integrity of which remains unknown, mucking in water the contents of which I dare not speculate, so that the arteries of our city may flow once more. 
Godspeed, guys. God-fucking-speed. 

The lives and homes lost are obviously going to be the most permanent reminders of mother nature’s recent all-out assault on the northeast, but beyond that, the most apparent scars right now are those of the area’s infrastructure. 

Even today, workers are still pumping out the Brooklyn-Battery (Hugh L. Carey) tunnel, which was said to have flooded from end to end during the storm. 

Measuring 9,117 feet long and roughly 30 feet diameter on the interior, if we assume the ventilation space above and below the roadway also flooded, workers have been faced with the monumental task of, based on my very rough calculations, removing over 48.2 Million gallons of seawater.

Feel free to run the numbers yourself!

GallonsPerCubicFoot(Pi*TunnelRadius^2*TunnelLength)

or: 7.48052(Pi*30^2*9117)

No matter how you squash the numbers together, that’s a lot of seawater. Don’t know how far along they are in the above photo from the MTA’s flickr - but it looks better than it did. 

As our lives inch back toward normal, slowly and often painfully, we really can’t forget that the reason things are improving is because people are working together and  improving them for us. 

So again - an infinite amount of credit and gratitude needs to be extended not only to the first responders saving lives, but also to the men and women working under our rivers and streets, in tunnels the integrity of which remains unknown, mucking in water the contents of which I dare not speculate, so that the arteries of our city may flow once more. 

Godspeed, guys. God-fucking-speed. 



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